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Philosophy

Reconsidering the End


I remember some of my childish visions for what the future would look like.  The future was all about new technology and number one on my list of future technologies were flying cars.  I always wanted to fly over traffic on long highway rides.  The future used to be something exciting, and filled with whirling gadgets and beeping lights.  I used to think things were improving as we all head further in time.

Today, I retain a different feeling from people when they talk about the future.  I am not sure if all the zombie apocalypse movies, recent wars,  or a distrust for the government that is stronger than ever, are the cause for all this dreariness.  It could be all of that.  After I got through watching a documentary called, Waiting for Armageddon, I realized why it seems like people feel like we are racing at top speeds towards a wall.

In anticipation of the “end times,” many evangelist Christians are pushing for Israel to claim the temple mount and rebuild Solomon’s temple.  They believe this would signal the start of the end.  A great many people see the current conflict in the Middle East today as a signal of the start of the prophecies out of the book of Revelation.  I was startled as several of the church leaders interviewed on the program grinned as they spoke to the camera, saying that they would love to see the final battle predicted to take place near Jerusalem. Others sat with a creeping smirk as they explained that it is prophesied that human blood will run for miles, as deep as five feet.

Where do these people get their confidence that they will not be included in the blood bath? Why do they relish in the idea of human suffering?  Why do they believe that we should help the process along by instigating warfare as soon as possible?  I believe that this attitude will redeem for those that subscribe to it, all of the aggression that they put in.  I do not believe the only way for things to take a better turn is to burn everything down.  I do not think we are innately incapable of creating a sustainable future. When your mother and father pass away, who will organize family events?  When they are gone, who will pay the bills?  We all will.  We the living, are in the control room and we will decide the path.  If a gigantic display of violence and anger is what the world desires, we will see this result in our futures.  When so many believe that they will see the end of the world during their lifetimes, does this not reflect in our decisions? The way to a better future is through hard work and dedication to it.  Not running away and leaving things up to prophecy.  For after all, if a thing is truly meant to occur, then it will.  Otherwise, it is only a man-made collectively-fulfilled prophecy.

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About Mike Friedman

I am a student in New York City, currently pursuing a masters in Social-Organizational Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. I am deeply passionate about psychology and very much interested in starting a business, and that is what drove me to pick up from Florida and begin studying in the greatest city on earth! I am forever a student and I am searching for an opportunity to practice my knowledge in an application setting. I am ready to activate my full potential for an employer that is interested in tapping my potential or working together with people that share my vision for a productive and engaging work setting!

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